Breast Cancer: “no level of alcohol use that is completely safe”

Even one alcohol drink a day can up breast cancer danger. Even the daintiest of drinks– may not bode well for ladies on the breast cancer front, reports the Washington Post.

That’s the conclusion of a massive review by the American Institute for Cancer Research study and the World Cancer Research fund that took a closer look at 119 studies including more than 12 million women worldwide, and the effect of nutrition, diet plan, and exercise on breast cancer risk.

Although a normal liquor-drink consists of 14 grams of alcohol, the report finds that even a little glass of wine, beer, or spirits (one with as little as 10 grams of alcohol) is tied to a 5 percent increased cancer risk in pre-menopausal females and 9 percent in post-menopausal females, indicating there might be “no level of alcohol use that is entirely safe” when it pertains to breast cancer, Ann McTiernan, among the research study’s lead authors, informs the Post.

Some excellent news: Researchers discovered exercise cuts breast cancer risks  —

Specifically, “vigorous” exercise on a routine basis cut the danger of breast cancer for both pre-menopausal ladies (a 17 percent reduction) and post-menopausal women (a 10 percent cut).

So what if you prefer to indulge in libations, but also frequent the fitness center? McTiernan keeps in mind alcohol boosts estrogen levels, which has been connected to breast cancer danger, which exercise can tamp those levels down– though that does not always mean it will counteract alcohol’s effects.

Although a healthy lifestyle does not offer complete assurance that cancer will stay away– McTiernan compares it to using a seat belt, per the Post– the AICR approximates that a 3rd of US breast cancer cases could be avoided if women kept to a healthy weight, worked out regularly, and did not drink alcohol.

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.